Environmental Programs

Environmental Programs strives to promote environmental stewardship, ensure regulatory compliance and mitigate environmental liability. We believe that active protection of the environment directly contributes to a happier, healthier community, while reducing financial risk to the university. Environmental Programs works to reduce UCSF’s environmental impact by:

  • Minimizing waste and pollution
  • Establishing and reporting on key environmental performance indicators, and
  • Raising environmental awareness among our staff, faculty and student body.

Sky Trim copy

Water Trim copy

Soil

EPA Other copy

AIR

WATER

SOIL

Related-Programs

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Frequently Asked Questions:
  1. What regulatory agencies does Environmental Programs interface with?
  2. Is my project / laboratory process regulated?
  3. Does my new emergency generator / boiler / sterilizer require an air permit?
  4. How long will it take to get an air permit for a new source?
  5. Is the Greenhouse Gas issue real?
  6. What is Environmental Programs doing to promote sustainability?
  7. Does my construction project require a stormwater plan?
  8. Can I buy a new large truck from Nevada and use it in the UCSF fleet?
  9. What is an occupancy rating / chemical load analysis and how do I get one?

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  1. What regulatory agencies does Environmental Programs interface with?

General Environmental Enforcement

Air

Water

Soil

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  1. Is my project / laboratory  process regulated?

All process / equipment that use / store hazardous materials or discharge pollutants to the air, water or soil have the potential to be regulated. This includes, but is not limited to, all stationary combustion, large diesel trucks, greenhouse gas sources, tanks, construction activities, and any process or lab procedure that discharges hazardous materials to the air or sewer.

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  1. Does my new emergency generator / boiler / sterilizer require an air permit?

It depends on the size of the equipment. The following air sources require registration and/or a permit to operate:

  • Diesel emergency generators > 50 horse power
  • Boilers > 2 million Btu/hr (> 1 million Btu/hr if dual fuel)
  • Any source that releases Toxic Air Contaminants (TACs) in excess of the reporting thresholds

If you have questions regarding a new or existing air pollution source, contact Environmental Programs for a consultation.

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  1. How long will it take to get an air permit for a new source?

Allow 12 to 16 weeks for processing. Large special sources, such as a new gas turbine, may take longer.

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  1. Is the Greenhouse Gas issue real?

Scientific evidence suggests that greenhouse gases are having a negative impact on the climate, although consensus within the scientific community is not unanimous. UCSF Environmental Programs believes that curtailment of greenhouse gasses supports the stated goal of minimizing UCSF’s impact on the environment. For more information regarding the research efforts from the California Air Resources Board, click here: http://www.arb.ca.gov/research/research.htm

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  1. What is Environmental Programs doing to promote sustainability?

Environmental Programs is an active participant in the UCSF Climate Change Workgroup, which works to lower UCSF’s carbon footprint.

Collaboration with project management during plans review and basis of design meetings may also yield energy efficiency / sustainable design features for a particular project.

Environmental Programs also works closely with Hazardous Materials Management to identify and implement waste minimization initiatives as well as hazardous materials substitution to appropriate non-hazardous reagents.

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  1. Does my construction project require a stormwater management plan?

All UCSF construction projects are required to implement measures to protect storm drains from sediment run off and accidental hazardous materials releases, but only those projects at Mission Bay have the full reporting requirements as outlined in the SWRQCB General Storm Water Permit for Construction and Land Disturbance Activities.

  • If your project disturbs > 5000 square ft of soil, you will be required to implement stormwater protection measures.
  • If your project disturbs > 1 acre of soil, you may be subject to the General Construction Storm Water Permit and will be required to submit a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) to UCSF Environmental Programs for approval and registration. Please refer to the stormwater section for more detail.

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  1. Can I buy a new large truck from Nevada and use it in the UCSF fleet?

Diesel engines are regulated by the BAAQMD for particulate matter. It is not likely that a diesel registered in Nevada will meet current emissions standards in California. In addition, it is illegal to sell a non-compliant diesel engine within the borders of California. Please contact Environmental Programs prior to the purchase of any large diesel powered trucks or equipment.

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  1. What is an occupancy rating / chemical load analysis and how do I get one?

All buildings have an occupancy rating that, among other things, dictates the total chemical volumes allowed within the building. Occupancy ratings are dictated by the California Fire Code. All construction projects or major changes in room usage may initiate a chemical load analysis. Aggregate chemical volumes within a control area are compared to the limits established by the California Fire Code and sent to the State Fire Marshal for approval.

Environmental Programs provides chemical loading analysis using the online chemical inventory system for both internal and external project management. Refer to the chemical inventory section on the Environmental programs site or contact Environmental Programs for more information.

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